Why do British say courgette?

Why do British people say courgette?

Zucchini or Courgette

The U.S. term, zucchini, comes from the Italian zucchina, which has zucca as its root, meaning, “gourd, marrow, pumpkin or squash.” Conversely, courgette is another French word that the U.K. borrowed. However, if a courgette grows to full maturity, then the vegetable becomes known as a marrow.

What food is known in the UK as a courgette?

What are courgettes? The courgette is a variety of cucurbit, which means it’s from the same family as cucumber, squash and melon. It’s one of the most popular vegetables in the squash family, being extremely versatile, tender and easy to cook.

What is zucchini called in Ireland?

The courgette is a member of the cucumber family. Sometimes called zucchini, courgettes are basically immature marrows.

What do the British call potato chips?

Lay’s potato chips have all sorts of different names internationally. In England, they’re called “Walkers” (and “crisps” instead of “chips”); in Egypt, Chipsy; and in Australia, Smith’s.

Why do British say Aluminium?

It all began, apparently, when an indecisive British chemist by the name of Sir Humphrey Davy in fact coined the now archaic word “alumium” in 1808. However, referring to the element in his 1812 book Elements of Chemical Philosophy, he would use the word “aluminum”, much as Americans do today.

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