What is the difference between American pronunciation and British pronunciation?

Why is American pronunciation different from British?

An important reason why American English and British English sound different is rhotacism, the change of a particular sound in a language. … Americans kept their rhotic American accent—for the most part. Port cities on the East Coast, especially in New England, had a lot of contact with the R-less Brits.

What do Americans pronounce different to UK?

“Both also can”

Word British Pronunciation American Pronunciation
1. Advertisement uhd-VER-tis-muhnt AD-ver-ties-muhnt
2. Bald bor-ld bold
3. Clique cleek clik
4. Either eye-thuh ee-thuhr

Which English accent is best?

British accent has been rated as the most attractive English accent in the world, according to a new survey by the CEOWORLD magazine.

These Are The Most Attractive English Accents In The World:

Rank English Accent Score
1 British 68
2 Irish 57
3 Australian 53
4 American 51

Which English accent is easiest?

Option 1: the American accent

Spread around the world by American cinema, music, television and more than 350 million North Americans (including Canadians, eh), this is the easiest accent for most people to understand, whether native speakers or non-native speakers.

Why do British say H wrong?

In Britain, H owes its name to the Normans, who brought their letter “hache” with them in 1066. … Hache is the source of our word “hatchet”: probably because a lower-case H looks a lot like an axe. It has certainly caused a lot of trouble over the years.

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Why is American English easier than British?

Britain has not been immune to the spread of American English, either. … Some learners prefer American English because they believe it has fewer regional accents and dialects than British English does, experts say, and therefore is easier to understand and to use.

Why do the British say mum?

In terms of recorded usage of related words in English, mama is from 1707, mum is from 1823, mummy in this sense from 1839, mommy 1844, momma 1852, and mom 1867. So in fact both ‘mom’ and ‘mum’ are words derived from the word ‘mamma’ with early recorded usage back in the 1570s in England.