Why did Britain lower the tax on molasses?

Why did the British want to lower tax on molasses and sugar?

Sugar Act, also called Plantation Act or Revenue Act, (1764), in U.S. colonial history, British legislation aimed at ending the smuggling trade in sugar and molasses from the French and Dutch West Indies and at providing increased revenues to fund enlarged British Empire responsibilities following the French and Indian

Why did Britain pass the Molasses Act?

The Molasses Act of 1733 was enacted by the British Parliament on the 13 colonies of America with the purpose of protecting its sugar plantations in the West Indies. … Instead of fair trade, British producers wanted to protect their market and lobbied Parliament for a tax on foreign molasses.

What did Britain hoped that lowering the tax on molasses would do?

By reducing the earlier Molasses Tax’s rate and expanding enforcement, the British hoped that the tax could be effectively collected. … The purpose of these taxes was to help pay for troops stationed in North America after the British victory in the Seven Years’ War.

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Why did England feel justified in taxing the colonists?

The Colonies were not happy about paying England’s cost for a war that had not benefited the colonies as much as it had benefited England. … So the American felt that they had already paid their share of the cost of the French and Indian Wars. The British felt justified in raising the taxes the American Colonists paid.

How did the British react to the Sugar Act?

In response to the Sugar, Act colonists formed an organized boycott of luxury goods imported from Great Britain. 50 merchants from throughout the colonies agreed to boycott specific items and began a philosophy of self-sufficiency where they produce those products themselves, especially fabric-based products.

When did the British start taxing the colonists?

Parliament passed the Stamp Act on March 22, 1765, to pay down a national debt approaching £140,000,000 after defeating France in the Seven Years War (1763). A year earlier, Parliament passed the Sugar Act, their first revenue-raising measure. Both taxes promised dire consequences in a post-war economy.

What taxes did Britain put on the colonies?

The laws and taxes imposed by the British on the 13 Colonies included the Sugar and the Stamp Act, Navigation Acts, Wool Act, Hat Act, the Proclamation of 1763, the Quartering Act, Townshend Acts and the Coercive Intolerable Acts.

What did the Sugar Act place a tax on?

The act also listed more foreign goods to be taxed including sugar, certain wines, coffee, pimiento, cambric and printed calico, and further, regulated the export of lumber and iron. The enforced tax on molasses caused the almost immediate decline in the rum industry in the colonies.

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What did the Molasses Act tax?

Molasses Act, (1733), in American colonial history, a British law that imposed a tax on molasses, sugar, and rum imported from non-British foreign colonies into the North American colonies.

Why did the British raise taxes on colonial trade?

Britain also needed money to pay for its war debts. The King and Parliament believed they had the right to tax the colonies. They decided to require several kinds of taxes from the colonists to help pay for the French and Indian War. … They protested, saying that these taxes violated their rights as British citizens.