How hot is Britain in the summer?

What is the highest temperature in England in summer?

What is the hottest temperature ever in the UK? The highest ever UK temperature was recorded in Cambridge University Botanic Garden on 25 July 2019, when the mercury hit 38.7C, beating the previous record of 38.5C in Faversham, Kent, in August 2003.

Why is the UK so depressing?

Revealed: Britons are among the most depressed people in the Western world thanks to job dissatisfaction. People in the UK are among the most depressed in the developed world as they grapple with problems such as job dissatisfaction, according to new international rankings.

Why is England so GREY?

Britain is particularly cloudy because it’s located in the Warm Gulfstream. The heat necessary to evaporate all that water was absorbed off the African American coast, and then transported along with the water. The air above Britain, on the other hand, is quite often coming from the polar areas and thus much colder.

Is Scotland colder than England?

Scotland occupies the cooler northern section of Great Britain, so temperatures are generally lower than in the rest of the British Isles, with the coldest ever UK temperature of −27.2 °C (−17.0 °F) recorded at Braemar in the Grampian Mountains, on 10 January 1982 and also at Altnaharra, Highland, on 30 December 1995.

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Why is England not so cold?

The south and south-east of England are the least exposed to polar air masses from the north-west, and on occasion see continental tropical air masses from the south, which bring warm dry air in the summer. On average, the temperature ranges from 18 to 25 °C (64 to 77 °F).

Has the UK ever hit 40 degrees?

“Southern England could see its first 40-degree day within the next ten years,” she said. The highest temperature seen in the UK so far was 38.7C, recorded in July 2019 in Cambridge. The five hottest days have all taken place since 1990. So what will a 40C day mean for us?

Why is the weather so bad in UK 2021?

This saw a large area of high pressure sitting over Greenland, which has then pushed the jet stream to the south, with low pressure bringing “wind and rain followed by frequent heavy showers,” Mr McGivern said. The cooler side of the jet stream also brought below-average temperatures.