Will English change in the future?

What will be the future language?

Here’s the thing: the data suggests that French language just might be the language of the future. … A study by investment bank Natixis even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin.

How English is evolving?

It has evolved through the centuries and adopted many thousands of words through overseas exploration, international trade, and the building of an empire. It has progressed from very humble beginnings as a dialect of Germanic settlers in the 5th century, to a global language in the 21st century.

How many languages will there be in 100 years?

Many of the languages ​​spoken today are in constant extinction. Linguistic predictions say that of 6,000 languages that are globally ​​spoken today, around 600 of them after 100 years will have simplified versions or will not exist at all.

Is the English language declining?

In a study published today in the journal Science, David Graddol, an expert in the development of languages, calculates that by 2050 the number of native English speakers will have fallen to about 5 per cent of the world’s population, from about 9 per cent in 1950.

Is French a dying language?

French, a language spoken natively on all populated continents, might be slowly losing some of its importance. … The French language is not dying, but rather, it is growing due to rising French-speaking populations namely oi Africa.

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What languages will disappear?

8 Endangered Languages That Could Soon Disappear

  • Irish Gaelic. Irish Gaelic currently has over 40,000 estimated native speakers. …
  • Krymchak. Also spelled Krimchak and known as Judeo-Crimean Tatar, this language is spoken by people in Crimea, a peninsula of Ukraine. …
  • Okanagan-Colville. …
  • Ts’ixa. …
  • Ainu. …
  • Rapa Nui. …
  • Yagan. …
  • Saami.

Are languages dying out?

Although languages have always become extinct throughout human history, they are currently dying at an accelerated rate because of globalization, imperialism, neocolonialism and linguicide (language killing).