Why do New Englanders say mum?

Why do Brits say mum instead of Mom?

In terms of recorded usage of related words in English, mama is from 1707, mum is from 1823, mummy in this sense from 1839, mommy 1844, momma 1852, and mom 1867. So in fact both ‘mom’ and ‘mum’ are words derived from the word ‘mamma’ with early recorded usage back in the 1570s in England.

Do they say mum in New England?

It depends on the British region or country – England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland – on what spelling or pronunciation is used for the pet name. In Birmingham and the West Midlands, in England, most say and write mom. Even the local newspapers and schools spell it as mom.

What does mum mean in England?

In the U.K. and other places, mum is used as a word for mom or madam. It’s also commonly used as a short way of saying chrysanthemum, a type of flower. Example: Mum’s keeping mum—I can’t get a word out of her!

Do New Zealanders say mum or mom?

Miscellaneous

NEW ZEALAND AMERICA
mum mom
post, postman mail, mailman
chippie carpenter
(cow) cockie farmer

What do Scots call their mothers?

Family words in Scots

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Scots
parents parentis
father faither, faether, fayther, feyther, fether
mother mither, midder
children childer, bairns, bearns, weans, wanes, weanies

What do British call their parents?

The UK generally goes with “mum” and “dad”, the Irish with “mam” (mammie). Down south (towards London) it’s pronounced “m-uh-m”, whereas up north (towards Scotland, Manchester) they pronounce it “m-ooh-m”.

Why do British people say bloody?

Bloody. Don’t worry, it’s not a violent word… it has nothing to do with “blood”.”Bloody” is a common word to give more emphasis to the sentence, mostly used as an exclamation of surprise. Something may be “bloody marvellous” or “bloody awful“. Having said that, British people do sometimes use it when expressing anger…

Is it mam or ma am?

2 Answers. Ma’am is used in UK in the armed forces and the police when a junior addresses a female superior officer. It is also used to address Her Majesty the Queen. Mam is used for “mum” in Yorkshire (see Alan Bennett’s diaries, for example).