What was life like in Puritan New England?

What was a characteristic of Puritan New England?

The moral and religious earnestness that was characteristic of Puritans was combined with the doctrine of predestination inherited from Calvinism to produce a “covenant theology,” a sense of themselves as the elect chosen by God to live godly lives both as individuals and as a community.

What rules did the Puritans live by?

Puritan law recognized the principle that no one should be deprived of life, liberty or property without due process. They also explicitly limited government power. Puritan law prohibited unlawful search and seizure, double jeopardy and compulsory self-incrimination.

What were two characteristics of the Puritans life?

Puritans lived a simple life based on the concepts of humility and simplicity. This influence comes from their religious beliefs and the Bible. Wearing elaborate clothing or having conceited thoughts offended Puritans.

What are at least 3 words you would use to describe Puritan life?

Three words sum up the Puritans’ ethics: sobriety, justice and piety. Our conception of the Puritan life is often dominated by the idea that they are serious. A Puritan life is not necessarily so. They had their fun.

What did Puritan homes look like?

A: Puritan houses were one to two stories high, made of wood, and usually had a stone fireplace.

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What were the advantages of Puritan life?

Puritans wanted their children to be able to read the Bible, of course. What were the advantages of Puritan life? Freedom and prosperity. Equality and community.

What challenges did the Puritans face?

A shortage of food was a big problem. So was disease. A plague swept through the colony, killing many colonists. There was also the concern about dealing with unfriendly Native Americans.

What were Puritans beliefs?

The Puritans believed that God had formed a unique covenant, or agreement, with them. They believed that God expected them to live according to the Scriptures, to reform the Anglican Church, and to set a good example that would cause those who had remained in England to change their sinful ways.