How common are UK surnames?

How common is last name in UK?

Most Common Last Names In England

Rank Surname Incidence
1 Smith 632,854
2 Jones 380,441
3 Taylor 293,387
4 Brown 283,796

What is the rarest surname in the UK?

British surnames on the brink – with under 20 bearers

  • Sallow (English) …
  • Fernsby (English) …
  • Villin or Villan (English) …
  • Miracle (Welsh) …
  • Dankworth (English) …
  • Relish (English) …
  • MacQuoid (Scottish) …
  • Loughty (Scottish)

What’s the rarest last name?

The Rarest Last Names

  • Acker (old English origin) meaning “field”.
  • Agnello (Italian origin) meaning “lamb”. …
  • Alinsky (Russian origin), a truly unique surname to find.
  • Aphelion (Greek origin) meaning “point of the orbit at the greatest distance from the sun”.
  • Bartley (English origin) meaning “clearing in woodland”.

What is a typical English surname?

It found 80% of the most common surnames were native to the UK and Ireland, among them: Smith (more than 400,000 bearers according to the 1881 census, compared with 500,000 today) Jones (more than 300,000 in 1881; currently 400,000) … Brown and Taylor (both just under 200,000 in 1881, now more than 250,000)

How common is Smith in UK?

According to Wikipedia, while more than 500,000 men, women and children share the last name Smith in the UK, over 2.3 million people, both of British descent as well as African Americans whose slave ancestors once were forced to take the last name of their masters, have Smith in common.

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What are the 7 types of English surnames?

There are 7 types of British surnames. Which one do you have?

  • Place name surnames. …
  • Characteristic surnames. …
  • Occupation surnames. …
  • Geographical surnames. …
  • Patronage surnames. …
  • Patronymic or matronymic. …
  • Estate surnames.

Where do surnames come from UK?

The use of surnames in England dates back to the Norman conquest in 1066. Prior to then most people had only one name. The Normans introduced names like Robert, Richard and Henry, which became so popular that surnames had to be developed to distinguish between people with the same first name.

Are surnames dying out?

There are several endangered surnames today, such as Pober and Mirren. … But while the less common names will die out on a large scale, the more common ones may be so widespread that human beings may go extinct before these surnames die out.